Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu

… is a really precious book I wish I had in high school. I am not even going to review it, because I want you to read it yourself. All I will say is it is not perfect but even its flaws make it worth reading. if you read the book, I have had a similar experience to Claudia and it really struck a chord with me. If I read this as a teenager, I would have identified as a feminist earlier in life.

As a bookseller, I will be recommending this book to all kids of all genders, and parents and aunts and uncles and people who like YA and people who don’t. I think this is a really quick, but important read that could justify or change your perspective. I would love to hear your thoughts, and hope you might purchase this book upon its release.

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All the Lives I Want – Alana Massey

All the Lives I Want by Alana Massey is the book I’ve wanted to write, and wish I did write. Ms. Massey dwells on pop-culture with the eye of a lit critic and the heart of a sad girl. From her essays on Lana del Rey and Fiona Apple to her explorations on Amber Rose, stripping, and Winona Ryder, I was glued to my kindle. Almost every essay in this book was a more serious and thought provoking adventure into my mind than I had ever taken myself, and I recommend this to all who have ever embarked on the sad girl journey and those who are intrigued.

we are okay – nina lacour

we were miraculous
we were beach creatures
we had treasures in our pockets and each other on our skin

p 113 we are okay

Ever since I read The Disenchantments, I have loved Nina Lacour for her honest and vivid depictions of young girls in love, and in friendship. I love her so much that I cannot pick a favorite Nina book, because they are all unique and beautiful in their own way, even from each other. The first few pages of We Are Okay did not grip me, but once I got into the flow – I am glad I stuck around because We Are Okay is no exception to my previous statements.

I could not put this book down. As the story of Marin and her grandfather, (and Marin and Mabel) unfolded, I was heartbroken and hopeful all at once. The plot centers around Marin and Mabel as they reunite in Marin’s desolate dorm after the heart shattering death of her grandfather.

When Lacour writes about Mabel’s family, she brings them to life. They are not merely characters on a page, especially Ana, who was my favorite character. She is a mother and artist who Nina gives life to through vivid descriptions of art – Ana’s own black canvases with silk waves, tattered butterfly photographs, and Frieda Kahlo’s work described intermittently in high detail, perhaps this was my favorite…

If you have ever wanted to read Nina’s work, or if you have, but not all of it, then pick up a book today, get some chocolate and your favorite beverage, and curl up on the couch in your sweatpants. You’re about to begin an amazing night in.

The Red Car

If you’re a writer, you have lots of random influences from other books, movies, songs, et cetera. It would take forever for me to explain to you how many influences I have, and you to me. One of my top five influential fiction writers is Marcy Dermansky. Her writing is clipped and functional, focused around her narrative and not prose, and this is just what I need after studying Fitzgerald for the past few weeks. His language blows me away, his stories capture my heart, but sometimes you need a break. Marcy Dermansky’s books give me a break, but not because they aren’t thought provoking or surreal. They are. I think that her style lends for easy reading of hard subject matter. Her characters are typically women who are bold, immature, and finding themselves for real, for the first time. In her debut novel Twins, Dermansky led us into the world of teen twins Chloe and Sue. I read this story after reading her sophomore effort, Bad Marie. I remember being struck by how different the subject matter was, while the quality and voice of the writer remained. 2016’s The Red Car is no different. I slipped back into reading Marcy’s work like a lavender scented bath robe and read about Leah’s literal and figurative journey like my life depended on it. I was not disappointed. As long as Marcy keeps writing, I will keep reading.

Now that I’ve read all of Marcy’s books I must patiently wait for the next. My TBR certainly will keep me busy.
I also truly recommend Megan Abbott’s book Dare Me, if you’ve already read Dermansky and enjoyed her – or if you’ve read Abbott and enjoyed her then I would try Dermansky.